Tag Archives: Hokusai

Bandits, Brigands and Warlords.

Kuniyoshi, The 108 Heroes of the Popular Suikoden: Du Qian, the Sky Toucher, 1827 Perhaps we should look at these tremendous Japanese prints of fighting men – heroic or tragic figures… bound as they are in myth and history – … Continue reading

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Portraits in Series in Japanese Prints

Kunisada, Both Sides of the Leaf, Past and Present, 1855 Anyone starting out collecting Japanese prints will be struck by the prevalence of enigmatic portraits, three-quarter length images of actors, usually in role and set against either a landscape background … Continue reading

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Edo – People and Places

Kunisada, A Scene from Yanagi ni Kaze Fuki ya no Itosuji, 1864 The November 2017 show at the Toshidama Gallery is called, Edo – People and Places. In ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints, the relationship of the characters (that form the … Continue reading

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The Beautiful Image of Fuji Appearing in an Awning…

Kuniyoshi’s Virtuous Women for the Eight Views analysed and how Hokusai’s Mount Fuji appears in the awning. Continue reading

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Why Does Everyone Hate Jonathan Jones?

I am adding this post as an addition to our recent ‘scoop’ on the exciting prospect that the little known carnival float designed, painted and carved by Hokusai may be loaned to the British Museum for its forthcoming show of … Continue reading

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Will the British Museum be Host to Hokusai’s Kammachi Festival Float in May 2017?

The photograph at the top of this article appears at first glance to be a detail from the  famous woodblock print by the nineteenth century Japanese artist, Katsushika Hokusai: Kanagawami-oki nami-ura… The Great Wave, or its transliterated name, Under the … Continue reading

Posted in British Museum, Great Wave, Hokusai, Japanese Art, Japanese prints, japanese woodblock prints, Kammachi Festival Float, Kuniyoshi, Obuse, ukiyo-e, ukiyo-e art, Ukiyo-e landscape art | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Journeys in Japanese Prints

Hiroshige, 53 Stations of the Tokaido Road – Okabe Station, 1847 The new exhibition at the Toshidama Gallery looks at Journeys, or travelling, in Japanese woodblock prints. Perhaps more than most art forms, the Japanese print, being at heart populist, … Continue reading

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Marks and Spencer and the Landscape Tradition

I was struck by the current billboard advertisements for retailer Marks and Spencer this week. It depicts seven successful British women dressed in M&S casual wear in front of an eighteenth century style landscape of rolling hills, coppiced woodland and … Continue reading

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The Enigmatic Japanese Cuckoo

For those familiar with, or interested in Japanese woodblock prints, the image of the falling cuckoo (above) will perhaps be familiar but perplexing. This enigmatic bird, drawn identically each time, appears in woodblock prints from the early 1830’s right into … Continue reading

Posted in Floating World, Hiroshige, Hokusai, Japanese prints, japanese woodblock prints, Kunisada, Kuniyoshi, ukiyo-e art, Uncategorized, yoshitoshi | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Impressions of Women – Ukiyo-e and Impressionism

Yoshimori,  53 Stations of the Tokaido 1872 It’s handy to think of national (or even nationalistic) characteristics in art; I’m thinking of books such as Pevsner’s The Englishness of English Art from 1955 for example. The reality is that people … Continue reading

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